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Uh huh.

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Apr. 2nd, 2004 | 02:22 pm
mood: cheerfulcheerful
music: Apoptygma Berzerk - Kathy's Song (C64 Version)

Grammar God!
You are a GRAMMAR GOD!

If your mission in life is not already to
preserve the English tongue, it should be.
Congratulations and thank you!

How grammatically sound are you?
brought to you by Quizilla

If I were copy-editing, I'd send back most of the sentences on this quiz; crossed out, in thick red ink, with "rewrite" written after. Being technically correct is nice and all, but it's more important to write clearly.

I'm also in the habit of cleaning up Quizilla's HTML before I post it. *sigh*

(The semicolon in that sentence above is "for clarity", a footnoted usage in some textbooks.  OK, I'll stop now.)
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Comments {7}

QOTJ

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from: sheenaqotj
date: Apr. 2nd, 2004 02:09 pm (UTC)
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It labelled me as a Grammar God, too. *yawn*

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truth without proof

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from: chronicfreetime
date: Apr. 2nd, 2004 04:45 pm (UTC)
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Quite the grammatical pantheon we have here....

Lots of the questions had more than one correct answer. I hope the author of the quiz knew that.

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Mickey Moore

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from: chiaroscuro25
date: Apr. 2nd, 2004 08:58 pm (UTC)
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Actually, I don't think I (also a "Grammar God", but see my comments) agree that there was more than one correct answer, except for those questions where "both/all are correct" was an answer you could chose. That doesn't mean the quiz was great, just that the author was correct about current formal grammar. Formal grammar of course doesn't always sound right to the ear, as it lags behind current idioms. (Recall that ending a sentence with a preposition was formally forbidden long after it had become idiomatically accepted; newer editions of grammar and style manuals now allow this usage.)

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truth without proof

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from: chronicfreetime
date: Apr. 3rd, 2004 10:05 am (UTC)
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On #2, I might choose not to personify the puppy.

#6 arguably depends on unsupplied context. Is her teacher in room 22?

"Whom" on #14 would be appropriate in a formal context; but it's surely a lapse of diction here, since this is clearly a fragment of spoken dialogue.

#16 asks you to choose between traditional or logical quoting. I suppose logical quoting (British style) combined with double quotes first (American style) is a bit of a bastardization, but it's what I prefer, and quite accepted now in technical documentation.

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Chef Monkey

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from: chefmonkey
date: Apr. 3rd, 2004 03:23 pm (UTC)
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    I suppose logical quoting (British style) combined with double quotes first (American style) is a bit of a bastardization...

This is a really fine point. The American Mathematical Society guidelines for formal writing specifies the use of this "bastardization." When I'm writing technical papers, I choose it myself. It's far clearer.

(cf. A Manual for Authors of Mathematical Papers)

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(no subject)

from: anonymous
date: Apr. 6th, 2004 09:51 am (UTC)
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really? ending sentences with a prepositional phrase is now acceptable???!!!

WOOO HOOO!!!!!!!

i knew if i kept it up they'd eventually have to accept my maverick ways. i feel like mick jagger must have felt when he was knighted by the queen.

-kim

p.s. -- i'm sending my journal to you from now on to be checked for grammar errors, triple. you've convinced me.

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stickylatex

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from: stickylatex
date: Apr. 3rd, 2004 08:45 pm (UTC)
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Not to mention typos. #7. __________ faced turned a bright shade of red. (Emphasis mine.)

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