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ichigyoshi haikai, mothafucka

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Mar. 2nd, 2004 | 11:45 am

to provoke debate
but reply with haiku --
is it 'bad form'?

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Comments {9}

dr. pangloss

(no subject)

from: denshi
date: Mar. 2nd, 2004 10:06 am (UTC)
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Have I told you that you're lovely lately?

:)

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(no subject)

from: nobodobodon
date: Mar. 2nd, 2004 10:55 am (UTC)
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I don't like haiku
it seems there is often not
enough room to fin

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dr. pangloss

(no subject)

from: denshi
date: Mar. 2nd, 2004 11:21 am (UTC)
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haikus are tricky
counting syllables is hard
need calculator

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(no subject)

from: nobodobodon
date: Mar. 2nd, 2004 11:31 am (UTC)
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some words have five sounds
linguists like to call those words
pentasyllabic

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Triple Entendre

pentasyllabic, with sprinkles

from: triple_entendre
date: Mar. 9th, 2004 02:03 pm (UTC)
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Excellent. And I can't help reading that in the Donut voice.

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Re: pentasyllabic, with sprinkles

from: nobodobodon
date: Mar. 9th, 2004 02:07 pm (UTC)
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Ooh, yeah, with the echo at the end! Very nice!

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Triple Entendre

My Dear Haiku Friends of the world

from: triple_entendre
date: Mar. 2nd, 2004 11:36 am (UTC)
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Concerning the style and rules of haiku for WHCtakashi, I would say, "Please relax and take it easy!". We have a rather strict regime here in Japan but what is most important is your poetic sensibility, how deeply you get moved by the subject of your haiku, and above all whether or not you have a haiku-like way of life or way of looking at things. You cannot expect to stumble into haiku all of a sudden while 99% of the time, you are leading a un-haiku-like life.

However, let me give you very brief guidelines of three major rules: -

(a) Form

I understand that 5-7-5 English syllable count is now largely rejected as inappropriate. Follow your poetic instinct and rhythm sense and let each haiku determine the right form. The important thing is that your haiku gives the feeling that it does have a form, that it gives the sense of brevity and it does have rhythm. For that purpose, read your haiku aloud many times until you are satisfied;

(b) Kigo

Again, I understand you practice non-kigo haiku as well as the ones with kigo. In principle, please use kigo, but not rigidly following Japanese kigo used in the Japanese way, which cannot be possible outside Japan anyway. Rather, have or cultivate your own seasonal feeling in your culture and climate and find appropriate words for it. How you feel with your nature and with your climate is more important than following borrowed concepts. However, avoid something which is so local to your area that no one else can understand in different parts of the world;

(c) Kireji (cutting words)

Kireji was introduced so that hokku (former name of haiku) could stand alone in its own right as it had been merely a part of a longer poem called waka and could not do so without kireji. This point is seldom understood. Thus, kireji (18 of them) make haiku complete. They appear in different places of a haiku, depending which kireji you use. Therefore, they also work as if they are caesura, adding dynamism, depth and more complicated structure to haiku which could otherwise be flat. So, make the most of colon, semi-colon, dash or dots when your haiku seem to benefit from them.    -- http://www.worldhaikureview.org/pages/whctakashi2.shtml


see also The Nature of English Haiku

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(no subject)

from: avice
date: Mar. 2nd, 2004 05:27 pm (UTC)
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There once was a man who was you
Who said wright me back in haiku
So I gave it some thought
But then decided not
From me only limericks will do!

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Triple Entendre

Greetings from Nantucket

from: triple_entendre
date: Mar. 9th, 2004 01:46 pm (UTC)
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excellent!

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