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Apr. 4th, 2005 | 07:52 am
mood: aggravatedaggravated
music: Poison Ivy

I seem to have a mild poison ivy rash on the pads of both my thumbs, and a tiny bit on the pads of the fingers opposing them. It's barely noticeable except when closing Ziploc bags, which is the only activity that I can think of that particularly involves those surfaces.

Can you get poison ivy secondhand via Ziploc bag zippers?

o_O;

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Comments {8}

Reese

(no subject)

from: ephemeral_ether
date: Apr. 4th, 2005 01:19 pm (UTC)
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How . . . odd. I hope it goes away soon, however you managed to contract it.

(ephemeral)

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(no subject)

from: nobodobodon
date: Apr. 4th, 2005 02:46 pm (UTC)
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I recently read somewhere online that poison ivy can only be gotten through direct contact with the plant because the allergen degrades very quickly in air. Symptoms don't appear right away, and often appear shortly after brushing or scratching against the affected area, which is why people think that you can spread it from one part of their body to another.

I think I read this on Snopes or some other Urban Legends site. Can't quite recall. I'll bet you could google around with it. Wikipedia might hold some clues, too.

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Mark W.

oils

from: sensedatum
date: Apr. 4th, 2005 03:35 pm (UTC)
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It's really an oil so I'm not sure if it could live on a plastic bag, but it can live on clothes or, if it's brushed on you, can go systemic and show up almost anywhere. I learned these things because I am *highly* reactive to it. More good information at the FAQ section of http://www.zanfel.com/

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=

(no subject)

from: marconiplein
date: Apr. 4th, 2005 05:10 pm (UTC)
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Can you get poison ivy secondhand via Ziploc bag zippers?

considering where you live? yes.

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JP Sugarbroad

(no subject)

from: taral
date: Apr. 4th, 2005 06:11 pm (UTC)
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Possibly, but unlikely due to degradation of the toxin in air.

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caliedoscope

(no subject)

from: caliedoscope
date: Apr. 5th, 2005 12:12 pm (UTC)
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I picked up a topical irritant (either poison ivy or poison oak) from a source other than the plant itself years ago, so it is possible (although unlikely) ... it tends to be highly localized, so from what you describe it would seem that you picked this up from a Zip-Loc(TM) or other slide-closure bag. The question then is, who is leaving contanimated bags around?

Another possibility is not a dermitital irritant like a plant oil but a semi-symbiotic organism like a fungus (warts, yeasts, etc.).

In either case it is paramount not to break the blisters, or, if broken, to not allow the fluid to contact healthy skin, since this will allow the irritant (whatever the source) to continue spreading. Unless, of course, you know some one who would benefit in some way from sharing this adventure in skin eruptions with you.

Physicians usually treat topical dermatitis with steroids, but homeopathic soap-and-water has been known to work too (in either case being mindful not to break the blisters). Good luck!

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Triple Entendre

(no subject)

from: triple_entendre
date: Apr. 6th, 2005 02:34 am (UTC)
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a little googling, and some inspection and introspection, suggests that, in my case, it is seborrheic dermatitis ("dandruff") aggravated and/or complicated by poor diet and stress. Sigh, gotta lay off the (giant stash of 90%-off) Easter candy for a while.

This was actually a pretty good nudge toward some useful web-searching; anecdotal reports say apple cider vinegar clears it right up.

Thanks!

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caliedoscope

(no subject)

from: caliedoscope
date: Apr. 6th, 2005 11:21 am (UTC)
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Google and I are as always happy to help. :)

Although this does beg the question: Dandruff on your fingers?

And just when I thought it was safe to get back in the water.

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